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Another From the King Arthur Playbook – Flour’s Original Pound Cake

I have to admit, I have a great love of pound cake. I know for some people it seems to be plain and not very exciting, but I love the texture and flavor of a good pound cake. It can go nicely as a dessert for just about any occasion, can be dressed up with fresh fruit or just whipped cream and even allows for some variation of flavors by adding different extracts, alcohols or flavorings. Another great thing about pound cake is that it is relatively easy to make, which is perfect for someone like me that is not the best baker in the world. The ingredients are all pretty basic and things you usually have around the house anyway so you can even put one together on relatively short notice to have a nice dessert or snack for surprise guests or for something to bring to someone’s home or party. While I was looking through the latest King Artur Flour catalog, I came across this recipe for their traditional pound cake and thought it would be a very good time to give the new oven a try and check it out.

Traditional Original Pound Cake

1 cup (16 tablespoons, 8 ounces) butter, softened

1 cup granulated sugar

4 large eggs, room temperature

2 cups all-purpose flour

1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup milk

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 tablespoon brandy, sherry, rum or other liqueur or extract of your choice (optional)

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Lightly grease a 10 to 12-cup bundt pan.In a large bowl, beat the butter with a hand mixer or stand mixer until it is very light. Beat in the sugar gradually and then add the eggs, one at a time, until they are blended in. Scrape the bottom and sides of the bowl and beat the mixture until it is very light and fluffy.

In a large bowl, beat the butter with a hand mixer or stand mixer until it is very light. Beat in the sugar gradually and then add the eggs, one at a time, until they are blended in. Scrape the bottom and sides of the bowl and beat the mixture until it is very light and fluffy.

In a separate large bowl, whisk together the all-purpose flour, baking powder, and salt.

In another small bowl, whisk together the milk, vanilla extract, and alcohol or extract of your choice, if using.

Alternately add the wet and dry ingredients to the butter/sugar/egg mixture, starting the process with the flour mixture and ending with the flour mixture. Stir the mixture to combine the ingredients after each addition. Pour the batter into the prepared pan, smoothing out the top with a spatula.

Bake the cake for 60 to 65 minutes, until it springs back when pressed lightly on the top, and a long toothpick or cake tester inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean. If the cake appears to be browning too quickly, tent it with foil for the final 15 minutes of baking.

Remove the cake from the oven and loosen its edges in the pan. Allow the cake to cool in the pan for 5 minutes, then carefully turn the cake out of the pan onto a wire rack to cool. Slice and serve the cake the same day or store the cake, wrapped in plastic or wrapped well in plastic if you intend to freeze it for longer storage.

The cake goes perfectly with ice cream, fruit, whipped cream or just by itself (which is the way I like it personally). I enjoy the cake with a nice cup of coffee, and it is perfect after dinner or even as a mid-morning snack. The cake is rich and buttery and has excellent flavor. I had made cakes before where I added flavoring like lemon to it or added alcohol for extra flavor, but the plain version works best for me. Freezing the cake is easy and lets you have a quick dessert for those last-minute guests. You can warm it up quickly in just a few minutes in a 250-degree oven until it is just hot, about 8 to 12 minutes, and it will be perfect. It is always one of my favorite, go-to cakes and this one is pretty tried and faithful to go with for any time.

That’s all I have for today. Check back next time for another recipe. Until then enjoy the rest of your day and enjoy your meal!

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Posted by on January 31, 2017 in Breakfast, Brunch, Cakes, Cooking, Dessert, Snacks, Uncategorized

 

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Coming Back with an Easy, No-Knead Deep Dish Pepperoni Pizza

It seems like it has been ages since I have had time to post any recipes I have tried. Now that the kitchen is back to being a kitchen again (and it looks great by the way), and some other family stuff is behind us, I can try to get back to posting on a regular basis. I thought I would try to ease back into everything with a simple recipe that I put together for dinner on Friday night. This one is from King Arthur Flour, which is my favorite source for all things baking. I buy a lot of their items for the different breads I make, but they also make an excellent pizza blend flour that makes a wonderful crust for pizza. This recipe makes a simple, no-knead pizza dough that you can turn out pretty quickly and dress up with your favorite toppings to make a great meal anytime. The recipe was published in their last catalog, and I thought it would be a great one to try out.

No-Knead Deep-Dish Pepperoni Pizza

1 1/4 cups lukewarm water

2 tablespoons olive oil

3 1/4 cups Pizza Flour Blend

1 1/2 tablespoons salt

2 teaspoons instant yeast

1 (15-ounce) can crushed tomatoes in puree

3 cups shredded mozzarella cheese

4 ounces sliced pepperoni

1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Grease or oil with olive oil a 9″ x 13″ pan. To make the crust, Stir the water, olive oil, pizza flour blend, salt, and yeast together in a large bowl to form a slightly sticky, soft dough. Let the dough rise, covered for 30 minutes.

Place the dough in the oiled pan and let it rest for 10 to 15 minutes. Pat and stretch the dough to cover the bottom of the pan. Let the dough rest in the pan, covered with a towel, for another 30 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.

Cover the crushed pizza crust dough with the crushed tomatoes. Top the tomatoes with the mozzarella, then the pepperoni, and finally the Parmesan cheese. Place the pizza in the oven and bake the pizza for about 25 minutes, or until the filling is bubbly and the topping is golden brown.

Remove the pizza from the oven and carefully lift it out of the pan and onto a cooling rack (if you have a large spatula, it is a big help here). Allow the pizza to cool for about 15 minutes before cutting it and serving it.

The pizza crust recipe itself is the same recipe you will find listed on the back of the pizza flour blend bag from King Arthur. I typically make the dough in my bread maker, allowing it to do the kneading and rising over the course of two hours. This method cuts that in half and produces a nice crust perfect for use in a deep dish pan or rectangular pan. I added some spice to the tomatoes, mixing in some Italian seasoning for extra flavor, and you could easily add some basil, oregano or another spice blend that you might like on your pizza for added flavor. The crust comes out nicely, and you get a good size pizza out of it that has nice flavor and crunch to it. It is certainly one I will try again since we make pizza here about once a month.

That’s all I have for today. Check back next time for another recipe. I do plan to do a post about the kitchen and some of the new gadgets I have to play with, so keep an eye out for that. Until next time, enjoy the rest of yuor day and enjoy your meal!

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Posted by on January 30, 2017 in Breads, Cooking, Dinner, Pizza, Uncategorized

 

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The End of the Turkey in a Delicious Way – Turkey Rice Soup

Now that I have returned from visiting family for the Thanksgiving holiday and gotten caught up with some of the work I had to catch up on, I can get back to trying to do some blogging. Even though I did not cook Thanksgiving dinner at home this year, I still had some leftover turkey from a couple of the turkey meals I had tried out before Thanksgiving. With that in mind, I naturally had to come up with some different ways to use some of the turkey meat and the turkey stock that I had created with the carcass from the turkey. I have made potpie and open-faced turkey sandwiches in the past and even turkey salad but this seemed like a good opportunity to try to make a quick and easy soup. I found this recipe at Food Network for turkey rice soup that was simple, used basic ingredients and was put together very easily. This recipe assumes that you have not already made turkey stock with the leftover carcass and gives you instructions on how to do so but if you have a ready-made the stock you can simply skip over that step and get right down to making the soup.

Turkey Rice Soup

1 turkey carcass
2 stalks celery with leaves, coarsely chopped
2 carrots, coarsely chopped
1 onion, peeled and quartered
1 bay leaf
8 cups water
3 tablespoons butter
1 cup chopped onion
1 cup chopped celery
2 teaspoons dried thyme
2 cups chopped carrots
1 cup rice
2 cups chopped leftover turkey
1 cup frozen or leftover corn
3 tablespoons fresh parsley
Salt and pepper

In a large pot, combine the turkey carcass, celery, carrots, onion, bay leaf and water and bring the mixture to a simmer. Simmer the stock for about 2 to 3 hours over medium low heat. Strain and discard all of the vegetables and bones. Reserve the turkey stock.

In a separate large pot, melt the butter over medium heat and cook the onions until they are tender, about 4 to 5 minutes. Stir in the celery and the dried thyme. Stir in the carrots and rice and toss the ingredients to coat the rice. Stir in the turkey stock and bring the mixture to a simmer. Cook the soup until the vegetables and rice are tender about 12 to 15 minutes. Stir in the turkey, corn and the parsley. Return the soup to a simmer and season the soup with salt and pepper to taste.

That is all there is to this particular recipe. You can easily make use of everything you have right in your home and have the entire meal done in under thirty minutes. It produces a very flavorful soup that you can use as a meal all on its own. You could certainly add other vegetables to the soup if you have some that are left over or just prefer having different vegetables, such as broccoli, green beans, peas or just about anything else. You could also swap out the rice and use noodles instead if you want to make a turkey noodle soup, though you will not have to cook the noodles quite as long as you would the rice in order to get them tender. Soup always goes great with some homemade bread or biscuits if you have them or even your favorite store-bought variety. You could also have your soup with a sandwich or salad to make it a more complete meal with that is what you want.

That is all I have for today. Check back next time for another recipe. Until then, enjoy the rest of your day and enjoy your meal!

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Spatchcock Your Way on Thanksgiving Day -Crisp Skinned Butterflied Roast Turkey

Thanksgiving is just a few days away now and you probably already have a plan of what you are going to do if you are hosting dinner this year or just staying home. I’m traveling this Thanksgiving so we won’t be cooking anything here, but with such a good deal on turkeys right now I couldn’t resist picking up a couple and used one this weekend to have a new turkey recipe to show for this week. If you have a smaller turkey for your meal (about 10 to 12 pounds would be small), there is a great way that you can cook your turkey, have it done in about 2 hours and have super crispy skin to go with perfectly cooked meat. If you have never tried spatchcocking a turkey before, it can seem a little intimidating at first, but all you really need is a cutting board, some poultry shears and a couple of good knives and you can make it all happen. You can also ask your butcher to do it for you if you happen to have one that you like. I decided this would be the easiest way to make our trial run turkey and came across this recipe from Serious Eats for an herb-rubbed, crisp-skinned butterflied roast turkey. I liked the recipe, but to be honest the herb rub did not overwhelm me, so I eliminated it, and went with this basic option, also from Serious Eats, that uses some basic salt, pepper and vegetable oil instead, and went ahead with this recipe. You could certainly use the herb rub if you like and follow the link for the original recipe.

Crisp Skinned Butterflied Roast Turkey

3 large onions, roughly chopped

3 large carrots, peeled and roughly chopped 

4 stalks celery, roughly chopped 

12 thyme sprigs

1 whole turkey (12 to 14 pounds total), butterflied, backbone, neck, and giblets reserved

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 1/2 quarts homemade or store-bought chicken or turkey broth

2 bay leaves

3 tablespoons butter

4 tablespoons flour

To butterfly the turkey, pat the turkey dry with paper towels, then place it breast-side-down on the cutting board. Holding it firmly with one hand, make a cut along one side of the backbone, starting down near where the thighs meet the tail.Continue cutting, working your way around the thigh joint until you’ve snipped through every rib bone and completely split the turkey up to the neck. Use your hands the spread the turkey open slightly. Be careful, the snipped bones can be quite sharp.Make an identical cut along the other side of the backbone. This cut is a little trickier, so make sure not to get your fingers in the way of the blade. Using a clean dish towel or rag to hold on to the bird will make it easier to keep control.There may or may not be a large excess hood of fat up near the neck. If it’s there, remove it. If you wish to make carving even easier, the wish bone can also be removed by making a thin incision with the tip of a paring knife or boning knife along both sides of it, and pulling it out with your fingers.

Turn the turkey over onto what once was its back, splaying its legs out in a manner that can only be described as inappropriate. Press down hard on the ridge of the breast bone. You should hear a couple of cracks, and the turkey should now rest flatter. Flatter is better for even cooking and crisper skin.Tuck the wing tips behind the breast. This step is not strictly necessary, but it’ll prevent your turkey from looking like it wants to give you a high-five as it roasts.

Adjust oven rack to the middle position and preheat the oven to 450°. Line a rimmed baking sheet or broiler pan with aluminum foil. Scatter 2/3rds of the onions, carrots, celery and thyme sprigs across the bottom of the pan. Place a slotted broiler rack or wire rack directly on top of the vegetables.

Pat the turkey dry with paper towels and rub it on all surfaces with 1 tablespoon of the oil. Season the turkey liberally on all surfaces with salt and black pepper (if using a brined, salted, or Kosher turkey, omit the salting step). Place the turkey on top of the rack, arranging it so that it does not overlap the edges, pressing down on the breast bone to flatten the breasts slightly.

 

Transfer the turkey to the oven and roast, rotating occasionally, until an instant read thermometer inserted into the deepest part of the breast registers 150°, and the thighs register at least 165°, about 80 to 90 minutes.

 

While the turkey roasts, make the gravy. Roughly chop the neck, backbone, and giblets. Heat the remaining 1 tablespoon of oil in a 3-quart saucepan set over high heat until the oil is shimmering. Add the chopped turkey parts and cook, stirring occasionally, until they are lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Add the remaining onions, carrots, and celery and continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables start to soften and brown in spots, another 5 minutes. Add the chicken stock, remaining thyme, and bay leaves. Bring the mixture to a boil and reduce the heat to a bare simmer. Allow the stock to cook for 45 minutes, then strain it through a fine mesh strainer into a 2-quart liquid measuring cup and discard the solids. Skim off any fat from the surface of the broth.

 

Melt the butter over medium-high heat in a 2-quart saucepan. Add the flour and cook, stirring constantly until the flour is golden brown, about 3 minutes. Whisking constantly, add the broth in a thin, steady stream until it is all incorporated. Bring the liquid to a boil, reduce it to a simmer, and cook the gravy until it is reduced to about 1 quart, about 20 minutes longer. Season to taste with salt and pepper, cover, and keep the gravy warm.

 

When the turkey is cooked, remove it from the oven and transfer the rack to a new baking sheet. Allow the turkey to rest at room temperature for about 20 minutes before carving. Carefully pour any collected juices from out of the roasting pan through a fine-mesh strainer into a liquid measuring cup. Skim off the excess fat and discard. Whisk the juices into the prepared gravy.

To begin carving, start by cutting off the first leg by slicing through the joint where the thigh meets the body. Next, find the joint between the thigh and the drumstick by rotating the drumstick back and forth. Cut through the joint with your knife, then repeat the process with the other leg. Remove the wings by locating the ball joint near the top of the breast and working the knife through it. The wings can be left whole or further separated into drumettes and flats by cutting through the first joint. Hold the breast firmly in place with one hand. A clean kitchen towel can help if you have a slippery grip or fingers sensitive to heat. Then slice down one side of the breast, using the tip of the knife to follow the contour of the bone. Continue using the tip of the knife so slowly work the meat away from the breast bone, pulling outwards at it with finger tips to separate the meat from the bone. Again, a clean towel can help if you have sensitive fingers. As you continue to slice, the breast should fall away in one complete piece. Make sure you take the tenderloin along with it. Repeat the process for the other side.

You now have two breast halves, two drumsticks, two thighs, four wing pieces, and one carcass from which to pick meat for leftovers soup. To continue cutting the breast into serving pieces, slice each breast into even slices on a bias. The hip bone is still attached to the back of the thighs and must be removed. To do this, pick up the flat bone from one side and shake it gently back and forth until the thigh bone pops out of its socket. Pry away the hip and save it along with the carcass for soup. Cut along one side of the thigh bone with the tip of your knife, removing as much meat as possible along that side. Repeat on the other side of the bone. Save the bone along with the rest of the bones for soup.Slice the dark meat across its width into thin serving portions and add it, along with the other meat, to a warm platter and serve the turkey with the gravy.

It may seem like it is complicated, but trust me it isn’t. I was able to butterfly the turkey without any trouble and it comes out perfectly, with the crispest turkey skin you might ever get. The carving does take a little getting used to, especially if you are accustomed to doing it a traditional way, but once you get into it, it goes pretty smoothly. I had an easy time with the breast meat, but the thighs were a bit of challenge. However, it is great to be able to cook a turkey this quickly so you do not have to spend countless hours cooking and if you prepare your sides ahead of schedule you will have no trouble getting dinner on the table just when you want it. The gravy, by the way, comes out fantastic. The rich stock you make while the bird is cooking is perfect for gravy and makes the meal.

That’s all I have for today. Check back next time for another recipe. Until then, enjoy the rest of your day and enjoy your meal!

 

 
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Posted by on November 21, 2016 in Cooking, Dinner, Gravy, Uncategorized

 

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Ina Knows What to do – Ina Garten’s Engagement Roast Chicken

It was great when Food Network actually concentrated on having cooking shows instead of all of the contests and reality shows that pretty much make up the network today. While it’s nice to go see some restaurants around the country and what they make, I would much rather see recipes and how to cook them. Other than watching Saturday or Sunday mornings, you are pretty hard-pressed to find a time when they actually have someone showing you how to cook something on television. That being said, when I am looking for a new recipe to use something specifically, I do often search Food Network’s website to see if they have anything interesting from when they actually did show cooking. Since I have made a lot of roast chickens, finding a different way to do it once in a while can be a challenge, but I found this recipe from Ina Garten for engagement roast chicken that was simple to do, used basic ingredients and produced great results.

Engagement Roast Chicken

1 (4 to 5 pound) roasting chicken
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 lemons
1 whole head of garlic, cut in 1/2 crosswise
Olive oil
2 onions, peeled and thickly sliced
1/2 cup dry white wine
1/2 cup chicken stock
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.

Remove and discard the chicken giblets (or save them if you are planning to make stock with the carcass at a later time). Pat the outside of the chicken dry with paper towels. Liberally salt and pepper the inside of the chicken. Cut the lemons in quarters and place 2 quarters in the chicken along with the garlic and reserve the rest of the lemons. Brush the outside of the chicken with olive oil and sprinkle the chicken liberally with salt and pepper. Tie the legs together with kitchen string and tuck the wing tips under the body of the chicken. Place the chicken in a small (11 by 14-inch) roasting pan. (If the pan is too large, the onions will burn.) Place the reserved lemons and the sliced onions in a large bowl and toss them with 2 tablespoons of olive oil, 1 teaspoon of salt, and 1/2 teaspoon of pepper. Pour the mixture around the chicken in the pan.

Roast the chicken for about 1 hour and 15 minutes, until the juices run clear when you cut between a leg and a thigh. Remove the chicken to a platter, cover it with aluminum foil, and allow it to rest for 10 minutes while you prepare the sauce, leaving the lemons and onions in the pan.

Place the pan on top of the stove and turn the heat to medium-high. Add the wine and stir with a wooden spoon to scrape up the brown bits. Add the stock and sprinkle in the flour, stirring constantly for a minute, until the sauce thickens. Add any juices that collect under the chicken. Carve the chicken onto a platter and serve with the lemons, onions, and warm sauce.

While it is a pretty basic recipe, it is nice to have one like this to fall back on when you want to add the simple flavors of garlic and lemon to your dish. The chicken comes out cooked perfectly and the sauce that you can make from the pan drippings has fantastic flavor to it thanks to the lemons and garlic. If you didn’t want to use white wine (which I didn’t), you can substitute water or just use all chicken stock instead and it will work also. You do want to make sure you are using lemons that are nicely ripened because if they are not you may end up with a sauce that is a little bit bitter to taste. You can always try to even out with a little more stock to cut the flavor of the lemons. I served the chicken with mashed potatoes and Brussels sprouts, using a different sprouts recipe that I plan to post tomorrow that can be great for any poultry, especially as a side dish for Thanksgiving.

That’s all I have for today. Check back next time for another recipe. Until then, enjoy the rest of your day and enjoy your meal!

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Posted by on November 11, 2016 in Cooking, Dinner, Uncategorized

 

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Cast a Vote for Your Cast Iron Pan – Cast Iron Chicken Teriyaki Thighs

It is hard to conceive of cooking any other way than with cast-iron for me lately. I have a few cast-iron pans that are used for just about everything because they cook very well, retain heat nicely and are pretty easy to clean. I have a few different sizes of pans and skillet so I can do pretty much anything from a small meal to a larger roast in the oven. If you take good care of your cast-iron pans, they can last for many years and you will not have to worry about food sticking to the pan if it is seasoned correctly. Outside of all that, I find that I can get a really nice sear and great browning on things like chicken when I use cast-iron. When I came across this recipe for cast-iron chicken teriyaki thighs from the Taste and Tell Blog, it seemed like a perfect fit for an easy weeknight meal. The original recipe is from a Americans Test Kitchen cookbook called “Cook It With Cast Iron.”

Cast Iron Chicken Teriyaki Thighs

8 bone-in chicken thighs, fat trimmed

Salt and pepper

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

1/2 cups soy sauce

1/2 cup sugar

2 tablespoons mirin

1 clove garlic, minced

1 teaspoon freshly grated ginger

1/2 teaspoon cornstarch

2 green onions, thinly sliced on a bias

 

Set an oven rack in the center of the oven. Place a large cast-iron skillet on the rack, then preheat the oven to 500°.

While the skillet is heating, The chicken thighs dry with paper towels, then season them with salt and pepper.

When the oven reaches 500°, using potholders, remove the skillet from the oven and place it on the stove over medium heat. You can turn off the oven at this point. Add the vegetable oil, and heat the oil in till it is just smoking. Place the chicken thighs in the skillet, skin side down. Place a weighted Dutch oven over the chicken to weigh it down, and cook the chicken until the skin is crispy and well browned, about 16 to 20 minutes. Start checking the chicken at about ten minutes and adjust the heat as it is needed.

When the chicken is crispy and browned, remove the Dutch oven and flip the chicken thighs. Cook the second side (without being weighted down) until it is browned and crispy and when the chicken reaches 175° as an internal temperature, about 2 to 4 minutes. Transfer the chicken to a plate.

In a bowl, whisk the soy sauce, sugar, mirin, garlic, ginger and cornstarch together until all of the ingredients are well blended and the cornstarch is dissolved. Pour the fat off of the cast-iron skillet and add the mixture. Bring the mixture to a simmer over medium heat. Cook the mixture, stirring occasionally, until it thickens and becomes glossy, about 2 to 3 minutes. Add the chicken and any accumulated juices back to the skillet with the sauce. Turn the chicken to coat it well in the sauce. Sprinkle the chicken with the green onions. Serve the chicken with the pan sauce.

Just a note about weighing down the chicken so that you get a really nice sear on it. If you do not want to make a mess of your Dutch oven pan, you can always place a piece of aluminum foil on top of the chicken and then place the Dutch oven on top you will be able to get just the effect you are looking for without having to worry about cleaning another pot once you are done. You can also throw a couple of unopened cans that you may have in your pantry into the Dutch oven to give it even more weight. The final result of the recipe is a very nice crispy skin that has a beautiful coating of the teriyaki sauce on top. The taste of the sauce was fantastic with the chicken and I served the dish with some fried rice that I had made to really make it a somewhat more Asian inspired dish. You can do the entire meal in under thirty minutes so it can be a great choice for any weeknight.

That is all I have for today. Check back next time for another recipe. Until then, enjoy the rest of your day and enjoy your meal!

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Posted by on October 28, 2016 in Cooking, Dinner, Poultry, Uncategorized

 

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Easy From Start to Finish – Peach Glazed Pan Roasted Chicken Thighs with Potatoes and Broccoli

I find myself more and more trying to figure out ways where I can make meals that are all cooked in one pan. Not only does this make cleanup much easier for all of us after dinner so we don’t have to spend 45 minutes doing dishes (no dishwasher for us; everything is done by hand) but it also allows for dishes that provide a great melding of flavors along the way. I particularly like to do one pan meals with pork and chicken. They seem to be the best for meals of this type and are most adaptable so that you can use potatoes or rice and whatever vegetables you like the most and cook everything together. Of course, adding some great flavor to your protein helps a lot too. I had picked up some peach preserves when I last went to the farmer’s market and have been looking for a meal to use them with. The preserves tasted great on their own so I knew they would really perk up a chicken dish. Instead of going out and finding a recipe like I usually do I decided to wing this one on my own and see how it would turn out.

Peach Glazed Pan Roasted Chicken Thighs with Potatoes and Broccoli

1/2 cup peach preserves

3 tablespoons soy sauce

1/4 cup light brown sugar

1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar

1/2 teaspoon powdered ginger

1 clove garlic, minced

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

6 bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs, trimmed

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

8 ounces fingerling potatoes, rinsed and halved

2 cups broccoli crowns

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. In a small saucepan set over medium-low heat, add the peach preserves, soy sauce, brown sugar, rice wine vinegar, ginger and garlic. Whisk the mixture until it is well blended and heat at a low simmer for about 10 minutes.

In a large oven-safe skillet or roasting pan set over medium heat, add the vegetable oil and heat it until it is shimmering. Pat the chicken thighs dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. Place the chicken thighs in the skillet, skin side down, and cook until the skin is nicely browned, about 7 to 8 minutes. Flip the chicken pieces over and heat on the second side for about 3 to 4 minutes just to lightly brown. Remove the chicken from the skillet and pour off all but 1 tablespoon of the fat and oil in the pan. Add the potatoes to the bottom of the pan and cook them for about 2 minutes. Add the broccoli on top of the potatoes. Nestle the chicken pieces into the broccoli and coat each piece of chicken with some of the peach glaze. Place the skillet in the oven and cook for 15 minutes.

After 15 minutes, coat the chicken pieces with more of the peach glaze. Return the chicken to the oven and cook until the chicken is nicely browned and cooked through and registers 170 degrees on an instant-read thermometer inserted into one of the thighs and the potatoes are fork tender, about 20 to 25 minutes.

The great thing about cooking this way is that you get the great flavors from the chicken and the glaze working their way down through the broccoli and potatoes to give them a touch of the sweetness from the peaches. You also get the nice roasting of the broccoli and potatoes as well, which is my favorite way to have each. You can use your own favorite glaze for the chicken to get the flavor you want (apricot would work well here as well) or even substitute pork for the chicken. You end up with nice crispy chicken that has wonderful taste and you get the entire meal done in one dish.

That’s all I have for today. Check back next time for another recipe. Until then, enjoy the rest of your day and enjoy your meal!

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Jennifer Probst

a little bit naughty a little bit nice

Laissez Faire

Letting Life Lead

simple cooking recipes

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